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Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli

Mahabharata of Vyasa (Badarayana, krishna-dwaipayana) translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli is perhaps the most complete translation available in public domain. Mahabharata is the most popular scripture of Hindus and Mahabharata is considered as the fifth veda. We hope this translation is helping you.

Section CXXXVIII

"Vaisampayana said, 'Hearing the words of Kunti, the mighty car-warriors, Bhishma and Drona, then spoke these words unto the disobedient Duryodhana, 'Hast thou, O tiger among men, heard the fierce words of grave import, excellent and consistent with virtue, that Kunti had spoken in the presence of Krishna? Her sons will act according to them, especially as they are approved by Vasudeva. O Kaurava, they will not assuredly desist, without their share of the kingdom (being given to them). Thou hast inflicted much pain on the sons of Pritha. And Draupadi also was afflicted by thee in the assembly. They were, however, bound then by the bounds of truth and it was for this that, they tolerated that treatment. Obtaining Arjuna now, who is skilled in every weapon, and Bhima of firm resolution, and Gandiva and the couple of (inexhaustible) quivers, and that car (of Arjuna) and that banner (bearing the device of the ape), and Nakula and Sahadeva, both endued with great might and energy, and Vasudeva also, as his allies, Yudhishthira will not forgive (thee). O mighty-armed one, thou hast witnessed with thy own eyes how intelligent Arjuna vanquished us all in battle before, in the city of Virata. Indeed, after this, that Ape-bannered (warrior) consumed in battle, taking up his fierce weapons, those Danavas of terrible deeds called the Nivatakavachas. On the occasion also of the tale of cattle, when captured by the Gandharvas, this Karna and all these thy counsellors and thyself accoutred in mail and on thy car, were all liberated from the grasp of the Gandharvas by that Arjuna. That is a sufficient proof. Therefore, O foremost of the Bharatas, with all thy brothers make peace with the sons of Pandu. Save this whole earth from the Destruction's jaws. Yudhishthira is thy elder brother, virtuous in behaviour,

p. 268

affectionate towards thee, sweet-speeched and learned. Abandoning thy sinful intentions, unite thyself with that tiger among men. If Pandu's son beholdeth thee divested of thy bow, and without the wrinkles of rage on thy brow, and cheerful, even that would be for the good of our race. Approaching with all thy counsellors embrace him fraternally. O repressor of foes, salute the king respectfully as before. And let Yudhishthira, the son of Kunti, the elder brother of Bhima, hold from affection, thy saluting self with his arms. And let that foremost of smiters, Bhima, possessed of leonine shoulders and thighs round, and long, and mighty arms, embrace thee. And then let that son of Kunti, Dhananjaya, called also Partha, of eyes like lotus-petals, and curly hair and conch-like neck salute thee respectfully. Then let those tigers among men, the twin Aswins, unrivalled on earth for beauty, wait on thee with affection and reverence as on their preceptor. And let all the kings with him of Dasarha's race at their head, shed tears of joy. Abandoning thy pride, unite thyself with thy brothers. Rule thou the whole earth, with thy brothers. Let all the kings joyfully return to their respective homes, having embraced one another. There is no need of battle, O king of kings. Listen to the dissuasions of thy friends. In the battle that will ensue a great destruction of the Kshatriyas is certainly indicated. The stars are all hostile. The animals and birds have all assumed fearful aspects. Diverse portents, O hero, are visible, all indicating the slaughters of the Kshatriyas. All these portents, again, are particularly visible in our abodes. Blazing meteors are afflicting thy host. Our animals are all cheerless and seem, O king, to be crying. Vultures are wheeling around thy troops. Neither the city nor the palace looks as before. Jackals, setting forth ominous yells, are running about the four quarters which are ablaze with conflagrations. Obey thou the counsels of thy father and mother as also of ourselves who are thy well-wishers. War and peace, O thou of mighty arms, are within thy control. If, O grinder of foes, thou dost not act according to the words of thy friends, thou shalt have to repent upon beholding thy army afflicted with the arrows of Partha. Hearing in battle the terrible yells uttered by the mighty Bhima and the twang of Gandiva, thou wilt remember our these words. Indeed, if what we say appears unacceptable to thee, then it will be as we say.'"





 
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