Epics
  The Mahabharata
  Srimad Bhagavatam

  Vedas
  Rig Veda
  Yajur Veda
  Sama Veda
  Atharva Veda

  Bhagavad Gita
  Sankara Bhashya
  By Edwin Arnold

  Brahma Sutra
  Sankara Bhashya I
  Sankara Bhashya II
  Ramanuja SriBhashya

  Upanishads
  Aitareya
  Brihadaranyaka
  Chandogya
  Isa
  Katha
  Kena
  Mandukya
  Mundaka
  Prasna
  Svetasvatara
  Taittiriya

  Puranas
  Agni Purana
  Brahma Purana
  Garuda Purana
  Markandeya Purana
  Varaha Purana
  Matsya Purana
  Vishnu Purana
  Linga Purana
  Narada Purana
  Padma Purana
  Shiva Purana
  Skanda Purana
  Vamana Purana

  Others
  Manu Smriti

  Scriptures
  Vedas
  Upanishads
  Smrithis
  Agamas
  Puranas
  Darsanas
  Bhagavad Gita
  Brahma Sutras
  Mahabharata
  Ramayana

Google

Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli

Mahabharata of Vyasa (Badarayana, krishna-dwaipayana) translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli is perhaps the most complete translation available in public domain. Mahabharata is the most popular scripture of Hindus and Mahabharata is considered as the fifth veda. We hope this translation is helping you.

Section C

"Narada continued, 'Here is that spacious and celebrated city of cities, called Hiranyapura, belonging to the Daityas and Danavas, possessing a hundred diverse kinds of illusion. Here in these regions called Patala, it hath been built with great care by the divine artificer, and planned by the Danava Maya. Endued with great energy and heroism, many Danavas, having obtained boons (from Brahman) in days of old, lived here, exhibiting a thousand different kinds of illusion. They were incapable of being vanquished by Sakra or any other celestial, that is, by either Yama, or Varuna, or the Lord of treasures (Kuvera). Here dwell, O Matali, those Asuras called Kalakhanjas who sprang from Vishnu, and those Rakshasas also called Yatudhanas who sprang from the feet of Brahman. All of them are endued with frightful teeth, terrible impetus, the speed and prowess of the wind, and great energy depending on powers of illusion. Besides these, another class of Danavas called Nivatakavachas, who are invincible in battle, have their abode here. Thou knowest bow Sakra is unable to vanquish them. Many times, O Matali, thou, with thy son Gomukha, and the chief of the celestials and lord of Sachi, along with his son, had to retreat before them. Behold their homes, O Matali, that are all made of silver and gold, and well-adorned with decorations done according to the rules of art. All those mansions are decked with lapis lazuli and corals, and made effulgent with the lustre of the Arkasphatika, and the radiance of gem called Vajrasara. And many of those palatial residences seem, as if, they have been made of the shine of these gems called Padmaragas, or of bright marble, or of excellent wood. And they are also possessed of the radiance of the sun, or blazing fire. And all the edifices, adorned with gems and jewels, are very high and stand close to another. Of spacious proportions and great architectural

p. 207

beauty, it is impossible to say of what material these mansions are built or to describe their style of beauty. Indeed, they are exceedingly beautiful in consequence of their decorations. Behold these retreats of the Daityas for recreation and sport, these beds of theirs for sleep, these costly utensils of theirs set with precious stones, and these seats also for their use. Behold these hills of theirs, looking like clouds, those fountains of water, these trees also that move of their own will and that yield all fruits and flowers that one may ask. See, O Matali, if any bridegroom may be had here, acceptable to thee. If no one can be found, we shalt, if thou likest, go hence to some other part of the world.' Thus addressed, Matali answered Narada, saying, 'O celestial Rishi, it behoveth me not to do anything that may be disagreeable to dwellers of heaven. The gods and the Danavas, though brothers, are ever at hostility with each other. How can I, therefore, make an alliance with those that are our enemies? Let us repair, therefore, to some other place. It behoveth me not to search among the Danavas. As regards thyself, I know thy heart is ever set on fomenting quarrels.'"





 
MahabharataOnline.Com - Summary of Mahabharata, Stories, Translations and Scriptures from Mahabharata