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Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli

Mahabharata of Vyasa (Badarayana, krishna-dwaipayana) translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli is perhaps the most complete translation available in public domain. Mahabharata is the most popular scripture of Hindus and Mahabharata is considered as the fifth veda. We hope this translation is helping you.

Section LIII

"Dhritarashtra said, 'Endued with great prowess and eager for victory, even as the sons themselves of Pandu are, so are their followers, who are all resolved to sacrifice their lives and determined to win victory. Even thou, O son, hast told me of my mighty enemies, viz., the kings of the Panchalas, the Kekayas, the Matsyas, and the Magadhas. He, again, who at his will can bring under his subjection all the three worlds with Indra at their head, even that Creator of the universe, the mighty Krishna is bent on giving victory upon the Pandavas. As regards Satyaki, he acquired in no time the whole science of arms from Arjuna. That scion of Sini's race will stand on the battle-field, shooting his shafts like husbandmen sowing seeds. The prince of Panchala, Dhristadyumna, that mighty car-warrior of merciless deeds, acquainted with all superior weapons, will fight with my host. Great is my fear, O child from the wrath of Yudhishthira, from the prowess of Arjuna, and from the Twins and Bhimasena. When those lords of men will, in the midst of my army, spread their superhuman net of arrows, I fear my troops will not come out of it. It is for this, O Sanjaya, that I weep. That son of Pandu, Yudhishthira, is handsome, endued with great energy, highly blessed, possessed of Brahma force, intelligent, of great wisdom, and virtuous soul. Having allies and counsellors, united with persons ready for battle, and possessing brothers and father-in-law who are all heroes and mighty car-warriors, that tiger among men, the son of Pandu, is also endued with patience, capable of keeping his counsels, compassionate, modest, of powers incapable of being baffled, possessed of great learning, with soul under proper control, ever waiting upon the aged, and subdued senses; possessed thus of every accomplishment, he is like unto a blazing fire. What fool, doomed to destruction and deprived of sense, will jump, moth-like, into that blazing and irresistible Pandava fire! Alas, I have behaved deceitfully towards him. The king, like unto a fire of long flames, will destroy all my foolish sons in battle without leaving any alive. I, therefore, think that it is not proper to fight with them. Ye Kauravas, be ye of the same mind. Without doubt, the whole race of Kuru will be destroyed, in case of hostilities being waged. This appears to me very clearly, and if we act accordingly, my mind may have peace. If war with them doth not seem beneficial to you, then we will strive to

p. 128

bring about peace. Yudhishthira will never be indifferent when he sees us distressed, for he censures me only as the cause of this unjust war.'"





 
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