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Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli

Mahabharata of Vyasa (Badarayana, krishna-dwaipayana) translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli is perhaps the most complete translation available in public domain. Mahabharata is the most popular scripture of Hindus and Mahabharata is considered as the fifth veda. We hope this translation is helping you.

p. 106

Section XLVI

"Sanat-sujata said, 'The primary Seed (of the universe), called Mahayasas, is destitute of accidents, is pure Knowledge, and blazeth with effulgence. It leadeth the senses, and it is in consequence of that Seed that Surya shineth. That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). It is in consequence of that Seed (which is Joy's self) that Brahman becomes capable of Creation and it is through it that Brahman increaseth in expansion. It is that Seed which entering into luminous bodies giveth light and heat. Without deriving its light and heat from any other thing it is self-luminous, and is an object of terror to all luminous bodies. The Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). The body composed of the five grosser elements, that are themselves sprung from the five subtler ones,--the latter, in their turn, originating in one homogeneous substance called Brahman--is upheld (realised) in consciousness by both the creature-Soul endued with life and Iswara. (These two, during sleep and the universal dissolution, are deprived of consciousness). Brahman on the other hand, which is never bereft of consciousness, and which is the Sun's Sun, upholdeth both these two and also the Earth and the Heaven. The Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). The Seed upholdeth the two gods, the Earth and the Heaven, the Directions, and the whole Universe. It is from that Seed that directions (points of the compass) and rivers spring, and the vast seas also have derived their origin. The Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). The body is like a car destined to destruction. Its acts, however, are undying. Tied to the wheels of that car (which are represented by the acts of past lives), the senses, that are as steeds, lead, through the region of consciousness, the man of wisdom towards that Increate and Unchangeable One, that One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). The form of that One cannot be displayed by any comparison. None ever beholdeth Him by the eye. They that know him by the rapt faculties, the mind, and the heart, become freed from death. The Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). The stream of illusion is terrible; guarded by the gods, it hath twelve fruits. Drinking of its waters and beholding many sweet things in its midst, men swim along it to and fro. This stream flows from that Seed. That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). Destined to sojourn to and fro, the creature-Soul, having reflected enjoyeth (in the other world) only half of the fruits of his acts. It is that creature-Soul which is Iswara, pervading everything in the universe. It is Iswara that hath ordained sacrifices. That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). Souls divested of accidents, resorting to Avidya, which is like unto a tree of golden foliage,

p. 107

assume accidents, and take births in different orders according to their propensities. That Eternal One endued with Divinity (in Whom all those Souls are united) is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). Accidents (which coming in contact with Brahman make the latter assume many forms) raise the universe in its Fulness from that Brahman which is full. Those accidents also, in their Fulness, arise from Brahman in its Fulness. When one succeeds in dispelling all accidents from Brahman which is ever Full, that which remains is Brahman in its Fulness. That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). It is from that Seed that the five elements have arisen, and it is in it that the power resideth for controlling them. It is from that Seed that both the consumer and the consumed (called Agni and Soma) have sprung, and it is in it that the living organisms with the senses rest. Everything should be regarded to have sprung from it. That Seed called in the Vedas TATH (Tad), we are unable to describe. That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). The vital air called Apana is swallowed up by the Air called Prana; Prana is swallowed up by the Will, and the Will by the Intellect, and the Intellect by the Supreme Soul. That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). The Supreme Soul endued with four legs, called respectively Waking, Dream, profound Sleep, and Turiya, like unto a swan, treading above the unfathomable ocean of worldly affairs doth not put forth one leg that is hid deep. Unto him that beholdeth that leg (viz., Turiya) as put forth for the purpose of guiding the other three, both death and emancipation are the same. That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). Of the measure of the thumb, ever Full, and different from this eternal organism, coming in contact with the Vital airs, the Will, the Intellect, and the ten Senses, it moveth to and fro. That Supreme Controller, worthy of reverential hymns, capable of everything when vested with accidents and the prime cause of everything, is manifest as Knowledge in creature-Souls. Fools alone do not behold him; that Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). Among individuals there are those that have obtained the mastery of their minds, and those that have not. Yet in all men the Supreme Soul may be seen equally. Indeed, it resideth equally in him that is emancipate and in him that is not, with only this difference that they that are emancipate obtain honey flowing in a thick jet. That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). When one maketh life's Sojourn, having attained to the knowledge of Self and Not-Self, then it matters little whether his Agni-hotra is performed or not. O monarch, let not such words as 'I am thy servant' fall from their lips. The Supreme Soul hath another name, viz., Pure Knowledge. They only that have restrained their minds obtain Him. That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). Even such is He. Illustrious and Full, all living creatures

p. 108

are merged into Him. He that knoweth that embodiment of Fullness attaineth to his object (emancipation) even here. That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). That which flieth away stretching forth thousands of wings, yea, if endued with the speed of the mind, must yet come back to the Central Spirit within the living organism (in which the most distant things reside... That Eternal One endued with Divinity) is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). His form cannot be an object of sight. They only, that are of pure hearts, can behold him. When one seeketh the good of all, succeedeth in controlling his mind, and never suffereth his heart to be affected by grief, then he is said to have purified his heart. Those again that can abandon the world and all its cares, become immortal. (That Supreme Soul which is undying),--that Eternal One endued with Divinity--is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). Like serpents concealing themselves in holes, there are persons who following the dictates of their preceptors, or by their own conduct conceal their vices from scrutiny's gaze. They that are of little sense are deceived by these. In fact, bearing themselves outwardly without any impropriety, these deceive their victims for leading them to hell. (Him, therefore, who may be attained by companionship with persons of the very opposite class), that Eternal One endued with Divinity--is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). He that is emancipate thinks,--this transitory organism can never make me liable to joy and grief and the other attributes inhering to it: nor can there be, in my case, anything like death and birth: and, further, when Brahman, which hath no opposing force to contend against and which is alike in all times and all places, constitutes the resting-place of both realities and unrealities, how can emancipation be mine? It is I alone that am the origin and the end of all causes and effects.--(Existing in the form of I or Self) that Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). The Brahman-knowing person, who is equal unto Brahman itself, is neither glorified by good acts nor defiled by bad ones. It is only in ordinary men that acts, good or bad, produce different results. The person that knoweth Brahman should be regarded as identical with Amrita or the state called Kaivalya which is incapable of being affected by either virtue or vice. One should, therefore, disposing his mind in the way indicated, attain to that essence of sweetness (Brahman). That Eternal One endued with Divinity is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). Slander grieveth not the heart of the person that knoweth Brahman not the thought--I have not studied (the Veda), or, I have not performed my Agni-hotra. The knowledge of Brahman soon imparteth to him that wisdom which they only obtain who have restrained their mind. (That Brahman which freeth the Soul from grief and ignorance)-that Eternal One endued with Divinity-is beheld by Yogins (by their mental eye). He, therefore, that beholdeth his own Self in everything, hath no longer to grieve, for they only have to grieve who are employed in diverse other occupations of

p. 109

the world. As one's purposes (appeasing thirst, etc.) may be served in a well as in a large reservoir or vast expanse, so the various purposes of the Vedas may all be derivable by him that knoweth the Soul. Dwelling in the heart, and of the measure of the thumb, that illustrious One--the embodiment of Fullness--is not an object of sight. Unborn he moveth, awake day and night. He that knoweth him, becometh both learned and full of joy. I am called the mother and father. I am again the son. Of all that was, and of all that we will be, I am the Soul. O Bharata, I am the old grandsire, I am the father, I am the son. Ye are staying in my soul, yet ye are not mine, nor am I yours! The Soul is the cause of my birth and procreation. I am the warp and woof of the universe. That upon which I rest is indestructible. Unborn I move, awake day and night. It is I knowing whom one becometh both learned and full of joy. Subtler than the subtle, of excellent eyes capable of looking into both the past and the future, Brahman is awake in every creature. They that knows Him know that Universal Father dwelleth in the heart of every created thing!'"





 
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