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Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli

Mahabharata of Vyasa (Badarayana, krishna-dwaipayana) translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli is perhaps the most complete translation available in public domain. Mahabharata is the most popular scripture of Hindus and Mahabharata is considered as the fifth veda. We hope this translation is helping you.

p. 34

Section XXI

"Vaisampayana said, 'Having heard his words, Bhishma, senior in wisdom, and endued with great effulgence, paid honours to him, and then spoke words suitable to the occasion. And he said, 'How fortunate that they are all well, with Krishna! How fortunate that they have procured aid, and that they are inclined to a virtuous course! How fortunate that those scions of Kuru's race desire peace with their cousins! There is no doubt that what thou hast said is true. Thy words, however, are exceedingly sharp,--the reason, I suppose, being that thou art a Brahmana. No doubt, the sons of Pandu were much harassed both here and in woods. No doubt, by law they are entitled to get all the property of their father. Arjuna, the son of Pritha, is strong trained in weapons, and is a great car-warrior. Who, in sooth, can withstand in battle Dhananjaya the son of Pandu. Even the wielder himself of the thunderbolt cannot,--other bowmen are hardly worth mention. My belief is that he is a match for all the three worlds!' And while Bhishma was thus speaking, Karna wrathfully and insolently interrupted his words, and looking at Duryodhana said, 'There is no creature in the world, O Brahmana, who is not informed of all these facts. What is the good of repeating them again and again? On behalf of Duryodhana, Sakuni formerly won in game of dice. Yudhishthira, the son of Pandu went to the woods according to a stipulation. He is now paying no regard to that stipulation, but confident of aid from the Matsyas and Panchalas, he wisheth to get back his ancestral throne. O learned man, Duryodhana would not yield even a single foot of land if thou appealest to his fears, but if justice requires, he would give up the whole earth even to a foe. If they wish to get back their ancestral throne, they should pass the specified period of time in the forest as had been stipulated. Afterwards let them live as the dependants of Duryodhana, safe and sound. From dull-headedness, however, let them not turn their mind towards an absolutely unrighteous course. If, nevertheless, abandoning the path of virtue, they desire war, then when they encounter in battle these praise-worthy Kurus, they will remember these my words.'

"Bhishma said, 'What is the use of thy talking, O Radha's son? Thou shouldst remember that occasion when Pritha's son, single-handed, over-powered in battle six car-warriors. If we do not act as this Brahmana hath said, to be sure, we shall be all slain by him in battle!"

"Vaisampayana continued, 'Then Dhritarashtra pacified Bhishma with words of entreaty, rebuked the son of Radha, and spoke the following words, What Bhishma, Santanu's son, hath said is salutary for us, as also for the Pandavas, and likewise for the whole universe. I shall, however, after deliberation, send Sanjaya to the sons of Pandu. So thou needst not wait. Go thou to the son of Pandu this very day.' The Kaurava chief then honoured Drupada's priest and sent him back to the

p. 35

[paragraph continues] Pandavas. And summoning Sanjaya to the council-hall, he addressed him in the following words."





 
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